Kat Holmes: Who Gets To Play?

Kat Holmes

“Inclusive Design doesn’t mean you’re designing one thing for all people. You’re designing a diversity of ways to participate so everyone has a sense of belonging.”
—Susan Goltsman, Founding Principal of MIG, Inc., co-author of Play for All Guidelines and
The Inclusive City.


Where did you love to play as a child? Maybe it was a hill near your home. Or the fort you built out of boxes and blankets. Or, like me, a tower of climbing bars rising up from the asphalt behind your school. Read More

Ian Bogost: Play Anything

ian

As a game designer, I’m often asked what designers of all stripes can learn from games. Games, after all, appear to be magical objects. Dark ones, even. From Tetris to World of Warcraft, games have an uncanny ability to lure players in. Once hooked on a game, people will spend nearly endless time pursuing bizarre and arbitrary goals—like navigating configurations of four squares in a grid to remove lines. Meanwhile, it’s almost impossible to get those very same users to spend more than a few seconds with an app, an experience, or a gizmo before they abandon it in disgust or boredom, never to return again. Read More